Friday Serendipity

Did you click on any of the links to help convince yourself that you really do want to make the easy drive to Spokane to hear Sunny Jane Morton?????

SUNNY JANE MORTON IS COMING TO SPOKANE
NEXT APRIL 6th for EWGS Spring Seminar

And who is Sunny Jane McClellan Morton, you rightfully ask?

Sunny Jane Morton is an internationally-known, award-winning writer, editor and speaker for the multibillion-dollar genealogy industry. She is a Contributing Editor at Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems Podcast, with more than 2.5 million downloads worldwide, and a Contributing Editor at Family Tree Magazine, the U.S.’ premiere publication for genealogy hobbyists. A popular speaker at events across the country (including RootsTech), Sunny is especially known for expertise in tracing U.S. ancestors, particularly in church records; her unique comparisons of the industry’s largest websites; and inspiring presentations on how to reconstruct and tell meaningful stories from the past. Sunny is the author of Story of My Life: A Workbook for Preserving Your LegacyGenealogy Giants: Comparing the 4 Major Websites and the forthcoming How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records (working title), co-authored with Harold Henderson, CG. She is the Co-Editor of Ohio Genealogy News and winner of the prestigious NGS Newsletter Competition (2017) and writing awards from the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors. She holds degrees in history and humanities from Brigham Young University.

Stay tuned to www.EWSGI.org for more information. That’s the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society in Spokane. 

Wednesday Nostalgia

Who remembers the 1962 World’s Fair in Seattle?

Or perhaps the World’s Fair in Spokane, aka Expo ’74?

If you did attend these events, or any other similar, have you written down your experiences there for your posterity??? All you have to do is Google the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 and see the images and write-ups about all the new and fabulous technology shown there to realize that our two world’s fairs did exactly the same thing: Showcased new technology. So do, for the sake of your grandchildren, do scribble down your memories. They will be so glad you did.

Tuesday Trivia

Ever given a thought to street names in a housing subdivision?? There may be genealogy clues hiding there in plain sight.

Take this Oswald street sign. It’s my understanding that the developer can name the streets most anything he wants and he often picks name suitable to the history and goings-on in the community.

In 1912, Ethel and John Peter Oswald bought land west of Spokane and raised a family of five children there. A grandson still owns the original house….. which is one mile from where this sign was erected. Do the folks living along Oswald Street ever give a thought to where the name originates?

My daughter lived in Pullman on Itani Street. She was told that was the developer’s mother-in-law’s name.

Monday Mystery

Know where the World’s Largest Egg Sculpture is?????

Did you guess Winlock, Washington, in Lewis County?

In the 1920s Lewis County was the second largest egg producer in the U.S. So they have this wonderful statue, which they often repaint as the mood strikes, to celebrate their “eggy” history.

Friday Serendipity

Just in case, here it is again! You really, REALLY want to come sit at the feet of such a really good teacher. Google her on YouTube.

SUNNY JANE MORTON IS COMING TO SPOKANE
NEXT APRIL 6th for EWGS Spring Seminar

And who is Sunny Jane McClellan Morton, you rightfully ask?

Sunny Jane Morton is an internationally-known, award-winning writer, editor and speaker for the multibillion-dollar genealogy industry. She is a Contributing Editor at Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems Podcast, with more than 2.5 million downloads worldwide, and a Contributing Editor at Family Tree Magazine, the U.S.’ premiere publication for genealogy hobbyists. A popular speaker at events across the country (including RootsTech), Sunny is especially known for expertise in tracing U.S. ancestors, particularly in church records; her unique comparisons of the industry’s largest websites; and inspiring presentations on how to reconstruct and tell meaningful stories from the past. Sunny is the author of Story of My Life: A Workbook for Preserving Your LegacyGenealogy Giants: Comparing the 4 Major Websites and the forthcoming How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records (working title), co-authored with Harold Henderson, CG. She is the Co-Editor of Ohio Genealogy News and winner of the prestigious NGS Newsletter Competition (2017) and writing awards from the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors. She holds degrees in history and humanities from Brigham Young University.

Stay tuned to www.EWSGI.org for more information. That’s the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society in Spokane. 

Wednesday Nostalgia

Do you have a little something like this in the box of “old stuff” from Great Aunt Gertrude?? Any idea what it was used for?

All during the 1800s, women had long hair and when they brushed their hair, and long strands clogged the hairbrush, they’d pull it from the brush and stuff it into boxes like the one above. So what for, you ask?

During the 1800s, women would then take that hair and fashion it into astounding art such as the one above. Hair keeps its color but does become brittle with time. So such masterpieces were kept under glass.

Think of the time such intricate work took! And the ladies did not have those magnifying lights like we use today for crafts.

Tuesday Trivia

Any dachshund lovers out there? We are legion!

My sweet little Tika has her own Facebook page (Tika Thinks) which she tends well even without thumbs to type. Her hero is Crusoe the Celebrity Dachsund whose YouTube videos are a hoot.

What has this to do with genealogy today? Absolutely nothing…….. BUT our doggers have enriched our lives since Day One. To that I’m sure you would agree. What sort of dear beastie did your ancestor have???

Monday Mystery

Perhaps this will be a “mystery solved” post for you all. Have you, like me, seen small stones places atop of tombstones or other grave markers? Know why that is and how the custom began? Apparently it’s an ancient Jewish tradition to put a small stone on a grave as a token of remembrance. Case in point, the grave of Oskar Schindler in Jerusalem:

When you next visit a cemetery and observe small stones on graves, or think to leave one yourself on the marker for a loved one, remember why this is. And perhaps remember Oskar.

Friday Serendipity

If you didn’t catch it last week, here it is again:

SUNNY JANE MORTON IS COMING TO SPOKANE
NEXT APRIL 6th for EWGS Spring Seminar

And who is Sunny Jane McClellan Morton, you rightfully ask?

Sunny Jane Morton is an internationally-known, award-winning writer, editor and speaker for the multibillion-dollar genealogy industry. She is a Contributing Editor at Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems Podcast, with more than 2.5 million downloads worldwide, and a Contributing Editor at Family Tree Magazine, the U.S.’ premiere publication for genealogy hobbyists. A popular speaker at events across the country (including RootsTech), Sunny is especially known for expertise in tracing U.S. ancestors, particularly in church records; her unique comparisons of the industry’s largest websites; and inspiring presentations on how to reconstruct and tell meaningful stories from the past. Sunny is the author of Story of My Life: A Workbook for Preserving Your LegacyGenealogy Giants: Comparing the 4 Major Websites and the forthcoming How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records (working title), co-authored with Harold Henderson, CG. She is the Co-Editor of Ohio Genealogy News and winner of the prestigious NGS Newsletter Competition (2017) and writing awards from the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors. She holds degrees in history and humanities from Brigham Young University.

Stay tuned to www.EWGSI.org for more information. That’s the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society in Spokane. 

Wednesday Nostalgia

Did you have an ancestor that helped take one of the U.S. censuses?

My grandfather, Henry Melville Potter, was an enumerator in his little town of Ashley, Illinois, for the 1910 census. This was his silver badge. I even had the little pocket notebook where he wrote down the census info for his neighbors in the town…… a clearly illegal thing to do but oh so fun to find today. And since the census was handwritten, I have several pages written in his handwriting which is also such fun.

If your (male) ancestor lived in a rural town, is it possible that he was a Census Taker for that town? Have you looked?