Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK –
NATIONAL ARCHIVES SEARCH IMPROVEMENT

If you haven’t tried a surname search in the National Archives Catalog in awhile, Claire Kluskens, Archivist with the National Archives, urges you to try again as there are so many newly indexed databases.

A search for the surname “Bode” provides good examples of what’s been added thus far. On the first page, there are references to persons named Bode in:

  • Labor Camps Bibliography

  • Military Service Records

  • Records of Lawrence Walsh, related to Iran/Contrai

  • Military fatal casualties of Vietnam

  • Presidential Appointments by Harry Truman (Post Masters were presidential appointees)

  • Records of the US Naval Academy

  • Records of the US Fish & Wildlife Service

  • Naturalization Index

  • Prologue article on Chinese Exclusion Act files

  • OSS Art Looting investigation

And, that’s only the first page!!

Just put your surname of interest in the search box at the top right of the home page:
http://archives.gov

Give it a try. What might you find?

This tip was modified from “The Twelve Key”, informational blog about U.S. archival records, by Claire Kluskens, archivist of the National Archives in Washington, DC., 4 November 2017.

If you would like to follow  “THE TWELVE KEY” , go to:
https://twelvekey.com/

Enter your email address to receive notifications of new posts by email. Remember you can unsubscribe at any time.

Seattle Genealogical Society News

VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX 

If you are looking for data on an ancestor that resided in Virginia during the decades 1780-1820, here is a resource Christine Schomaker, SGS board member and desk volunteer, would like to share with you.

The Virginia Personal Property Tax, “PPT”, has been collected almost every year since 1782. In Colonial Virginia the noun “tithable”  referred to a person who paid, or for whom someone else paid, one of the taxes imposed by the General Assembly. Basically it was a tax on the productive workforce; free white males over 16, all slaves – both male and female, both African American and Native American. White females were not recorded unless they where head-of-household.

In these early decades, the annual “PPT” list reads like a census with counts of “tithables” plus horses, cattle and whatever else was legally defined as taxable property at the time. Complete microfilms of the original PPT lists for nearly all counties are available at the Library of Virginia in Richmond and may be borrowed on interlibrary loan.

Read more about it at:

http://www.lva.virginia.gov/public/guides/pptax.htm

Thanks to Steve and Bunny Binns, some of these records can be viewed online! Their free website “Virginia Tax List Censuses” offers indexed and linked images of the 1790, 1800, and a few 1810 PPT lists as substitutes for the lost US Federal Censuses of Virginia for those years.  Here’s the link to their site:

http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/

You will probably want to see all the intervening tax years as well. You can track families arriving and moving away, sons turning 16 or 21, and property owners passing on, leaving widows in charge. The Binns have you covered here, too. You can purchase CD’s of the PPT list images for each county available. Or, better yet, you can subscribe to the “Tax List Club” and have online access to all of them.  Although these images are not indexed, beginning in 1787, most counties recorded surnames alphabetically by first letter and you can navigate pretty quickly to the appropriate image file. Find out more here:

http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/

Stop by the SGS library some Tuesday and Christine will be happy to help you get started exploring the Virginia PPT. Ask for a short tutorial.

Even in this day and age not everything can be found online, so while you’re at our library check out the three-volume set, “The 1787 Census Of Virginia”. It was intended as a substitute for the lost 1790 US Federal Census of Virginia. Transcribed and indexed by Netti Schreiner-Yantis & Florene Speakman Love, this set also includes those counties now in Kentucky and West Virginia, which separated from Virginia in 1792 and 1863, respectively.

You can find this set on the Virginia shelf at the SGS Library, call number: VA:0-150 a,b,c.

          SGS CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Unless otherwise indicated all programs will be at the SGS Library, 6200 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle. Check the SGS Web Site for additions, changes, and corrections. Programs may be canceled or postponed because of inclement weather. The SGS Library will be closed  from December 22 through January 1, 2018, for the holidays. The Scandinavian Interest Group will not meet in December.

Please note the time change for the Family Tree Interest Group on Saturday, December 2;  they will be meeting at 1:00 pm.

DECEMBER

Saturday, December 2, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Family Tree Interest Group, Lou Daly, leader of this special interest group exploring all the features of the tool Family Tree on FamilySearch

Saturday, December 9, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Family Tree Maker (FTM) Users Group, with Reiley Kidd and Betty Ravenholt, leaders

Saturday, December 16, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, December 16, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, German SIG, with Jean Roth

JANUARY 

Saturday, January 6, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Family Tree Interest Group, Lou Daly, leader of this special interest group exploring all the features of the tool Family Tree on FamilySearch

Saturday, January 13, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Second Saturday Speaker Series, “Chinese Exclusion Act Files – Original Documents at NARA” will be presented by Trish Nicola

Sunday, January 14, 1:30pm – 3:00pm, Scandinavian SIG, with Karen Knudson

Saturday, January 20, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, January 20, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, German SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, January 27, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm, DNA SIG, this group meets at the Wedgwood Presbyterian Church, 8008 35th Ave NE, Seattle. For more information contact SGSDNASIG@gmail.com Co-chaired by Cary Bright and Herb McDaniel.

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK –
PAY-PER-VIEW AT SCOTLAND’S PEOPLE

Set up an account, register for free and search for free! I often shy away from this offer, finding it to be more trouble than it’s worth. But not in this case. I truly like the National Records of Scotland – Scotland’s People website.

A list of records you will find there include :
• Statutory Records – Birth, Marriage, Death – 1855 to present
• Census Returns – 1841 to 1911
• Valuation Rolls – 1855 to 1935
• Legal Records – Wills, Etc. – some as old as 1513
• Old Parish Records – some as old as 1553

The search tool is very comprehensive. Check out all the search options – exact, fuzzy, wild card. Valuation rolls are tax rolls of structures showing owner/occupant data including occupation.

Sometimes you can take what information you can glean from the search results and use it to find additional information in your Ancestry, FindMyPast, or FamilySearch account, thus avoiding having to pay-per-view at Scotland’s People.

If you want to purchase the actual record image it’s a simple process. You buy “credits” with a credit card or PayPal. Remember currency conversion and fees may apply. These credits are good for a year. If you allow them to go inactive after a year, they will be reactivated when, and if, you purchase more credits. The cost of record types varies. One experienced user estimates a ballpark figure for the cost of a record averages less than $2.50 US Dollars. Certified copies are more expensive and usually unnecessary, is another good tip from experienced users. Once you have purchased an image it is stored on your account. There will be no need to purchase it again. A purchase buys you the entire page, not just the record of the individual you are researching.

At Youtube, there are four videos, about 15 minutes each, on using Scotland’s People by Amberly B. They are worthwhile in helping you get started and comfortable with the process. The urls you will need are listed below.

www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

Seattle Genealogical Society News

SUCH A SUCCESS

Hopefully you didn’t miss Dick Eastman, publisher of the popular Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, at the SGS Fall Seminar a few weeks ago. He spoke to a packed house and it was a fun day. Attendees appreciated that there was plenty of opportunity for Q&A.

The Seminar Committee anticipated a larger than usual crowd so they commissioned two rooms for this seminar. The room usually used for the presentation was set up just to accommodate registration, book sales, refreshments, and plenty of lunch tables. A larger auditorium, set up classroom style with chairs and writing tables, was dedicated to the lecture. Everyone seemed to like the new arrangement.

Did you catch Dick’s recent blog with kind words and thanks to SGS? The sentiment is reciprocated. Thanks so much to you, Dick. It was a great seminar.

A link to that blog is here : https://blog.eogn.com/2017/10/23/thank-you-seattle-genealogical-society/#more-20229

HURRY – FREE THROUGH NOVEMBER 17th

The recording of webinar “Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence” by Jill Morelli, CG is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Most are familiar with the decennial censuses, but the non-population schedules can also provide evidence and context for your family history. Using basic analytical skills and correlating tools, investigate five different records sets which shed light on many aspects of your ancestors lives and enrich your stories of them.

SGS CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Unless otherwise indicated all programs will be at the SGS Library, 6200 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle. Check the SGS Web Site for additions, changes, and corrections. Programs may be canceled or postponed because of inclement weather. The SGS Library will be closed from November 23 through November 27 and from December 22 through January 1, 2018, for the holidays. The Scandinavian Interest Group will not meet in December.

NOVEMBER

Saturday, November 18, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, November 18, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, Women in WWI, presented by Lisa Oberg

Sunday, November 19, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm, DNA Workshop, Led by Cary Bright with first hour on a specific topic, and the second hour open for sharing DNA issues with focus on GenomeMate Pro.

DECEMBER

Saturday, December 2, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Family Tree Interest Group, Lou Daly, leader of this special interest group exploring all the features of the tool Family Tree on FamilySearch.

Saturday, December 9, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Family Tree Maker (FTM) Users Group, with Reiley Kidd and Betty Ravenholt, leaders

Saturday, December 16, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, December 16, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, German SIG, with Jean Roth

 

Seattle Genealogical Society News

SPOOKIER THAN HALLOWEEN

Everyone has heard of the infamous Salem Witch Trials of 1692, but did you realize the first witch trials and executions actually began in colonial Connecticut decades earlier?

 

In 1642, the law was enacted and in 1647, the first hanging took place. The law simply stated “If any man or woman be a witch (that is) hath or consulted with a familiar spirit, they shall be put to death”, and only one eyewitness was required for a conviction.

Of course, you were entitled to a trial and a jury of your “peers”. Of eleven documented executions, nine were poor women. Reading the court records, you can see the jurors, “peers”, so to speak, were likely a Mr Phelps, Mr Wadsworth, Mr Talcott, Mr Bacon, Mr Grisswold, Mr Dickson, Mr Whiting, Mr Deming, Mr Clark, Mr Allyn, Mr Steele, and Mr Moore. The only two men ever convicted in Connecticut, were convicted along with their wives.

In 1662, Governor Winthrop established that each act of alleged witchcraft must have two eyewitnesses for a conviction and no witches were executed in Connecticut after that time. In total 35 residents were accused. Some were acquitted, but some fled, fearing for their lives.

Were your colonial ancestors part of this witchcraft frenzy, as one of the persecuted, as an accuser, or on a jury? Be sure to check out the Tip-of-the-Week in this edition for links to some great resources on published court records for the early Colony of Connecticut.

A CALL FOR ARTICLES

Since most genealogists love sharing their research and family story, and SGS is always looking for interesting articles for the semi-annual Journal of the Seattle Genealogical Society, why not consider writing something for publication?

 

Suitable subjects would be original compositions detailing your research experiences, maybe an unusual research problem and how you solved it, hints and tips for fellow researchers, or even reviewing a genealogically based tour. No one is probably better able than yourself to convey the family history story you have compiled from letters, diaries, scrapbooks, family Bibles, community and public records. Would your story interest others?

The Journal of the Seattle Genealogical Society editorial staff would certainly welcome your submission. Help is available for inexperienced writers. All submissions will be reviewed and edited for style and length as needed. Submissions should include citations on how and where you found the information. Please check the SGS website for writing guidelines. Original manuscripts cannot be returned, so keep a copy for your records. Previously published material will be considered if the sources, date of publication, and the publication’s address are noted.

Interested or have questions? You may contact the editorial staff or the Director of Publications via email at :
publications@seattlegenealogicalsociety.org

 

NEW EXHIBIT AT NAAM

Lisa Myers Bulmash, a genealogy buff, mom of two, and artist who explores African American heritage through her work, will have an exhibit of her art at the Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S Massachussetts St, Seattle, WA 98144. It will run from November 5, 2017 through April 8, 2018.

The exhibit, “You’re Not From Around Here, Are You?”, explores topics that are top-of-mind for many:
•historical images, including people of color
•gentrification
•feeling targeted or excluded for who we are
•looking for a “safe space”
•what it means to be a person of color in the Northwest

For more info on Lisa’s exhibit and to see what all NAAM has to offer, visit the website at :

www.naamnw.org

The mission of NAAM is to spread knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of the histories, arts and cultures of people of African descent for the enrichment of all. The museum presents and preserves connections between the Pacific Northwest and people of African descent. NAAM also investigates and celebrates Black experiences in America through exhibitions, programs and events.

Lisa Myers Bulmash is the winner of a 2016 Sustainable Arts Foundation grant, an award to support artists with children under age 18. Her work and commentary have been highlighted in five books as well. Myers Bulmash exhibits her work in group and solo shows throughout the Seattle metro area.

Second Saturdays at SGS

On Saturday, November 11, following a short SGS membership business meeting, our Second Saturday program will be Mary Kathryn Kozy presenting “Using Social Media for Family History: Why Bother?” With the popularity of social media, sites like Facebook, Pinterest, and YouTube, as well as webinars, blogs, and podcasts, can be invaluable for meeting new cousins, sharing research ideas, records, photos, and genealogical education. Come learn how social media can help you further your genealogy research goals.

 

SAVE THE DATES

2017 Washington Family History Fair,
LDS – the Bellevue Stake Center,
14536 Main St,
Bellevue, WA
Saturday, November 4, 2017

It’s time again for the annual Washington Family History Fair. Always free, always informative, a different venue.

Early registration is encouraged so they can plan resources accordingly. The classes schedule is listed at the bottom of the online registration form. You can also pay for and order your lunch and order a printed syllabus on the registration form.

Speakers include our Jean A Roth.

Registration for the Family History Fair is at:

https://www.wafamilyhistory.com/2017/registration.html

Overview of Scandinavian Resources,
Stillaquamish Valley Genealogical Society,
6111 188th Pl NE,
Arlington, WA 98223
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Jill Morelli, CG and president of SGS, is presenting an Overview of Scandinavian Resources which introduces three major record sets of Sweden, Denmark and Norway in a two part series. Part one was on Tuesday, October 10th. Part 2 will be Tuesday, November 14th at 1 pm. This will be held at the Stillaguamish Valley Genealogical Society Library, and is free to the public. It will be followed by the regular meeting of the SVGS. Jill lectures and writes about her research and discoveries as a family historian. She is a member of the Genealogical Speakers Guild, Association of Professional Genealogists and numerous societies.

SGS CALENDAR OF EVENTS

 

Unless otherwise indicated all programs will be at the SGS Library, 6200 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle. Check the SGS Web Site for additions, changes, and corrections. Programs may be canceled or postponed because of inclement weather. The SGS Library will be closed from November 23 through November 27 and from December 22 through January 1, 2018, for the holidays.

 

NOVEMBER

Saturday, November 4, 1:00p m – 3:00 pm, Family Tree Interest Group, Lou Daly, leader of this new special interest group exploring all the features of the tool Family Tree on FamilySearch.

Tuesday, November 7, 12:30pm-2:30pm, DNA Tech Tuesday, with Cary Bright.

Saturday, November 11, 1:00p m – 3:00 pm, Fall Membership Meeting & Second Saturday Speaker Series, a short membership business meeting will be followed by Mary Kathryn Kozy presenting “Using Social Media for Family History: Why Bother?”

Sunday, November 12, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm, Scandinavian Interest Group, Karen Knudson, leader. A workshop for your Scandinavian genealogy.

Saturday, November 18, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, November 18, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, Women in WWI, presented by Lisa Oberg

Sunday, November 19, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm, DNA Workshop, Led by Cary Bright with first hour on a specific topic, and the second hour open for sharing DNA issues with focus on GenomeMate Pro.

DECEMBER

Saturday, December 2, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Family Tree Interest Group, Lou Daly, leader of this special interest group exploring all the features of the tool Family Tree on FamilySearch.

Saturday, December 9, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Family Tree Maker (FTM) Users Group, with Reiley Kidd and Betty Ravenholt, leaders

Sunday, December 10, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm, Scandinavian Interest Group, Karen Knudson, leader. A workshop for your Scandinavian genealogy.

Saturday, December 16, 10:15am – 12:15pm, Irish SIG, with Jean Roth

Saturday, December 16, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, German SIG, with Jean Roth

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK –
COURT RECORDS IN COLONIAL CONNECTICUT

If you have Connecticut ancestors, you are fortunate because there are plenty of early records available.

The Particular Court, sometimes called the Quarter Court because it was required to meet once every quarter, was an early court in Connecticut. A book, “Records of the Particular court of Connecticut, 1639-1663”, published by the Connecticut Historical Society is viewable and searchable at Hathi Trust Digital Library.  Go to :

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001643172

Click on the Full View. There’s a box for your search criteria and a FIND button right next to it, toward the top right corner. If you search for John Carrington or Mary Johnson, two unfortunates that were hung for witchcraft, you will find that wasn’t their only run-in with the law. They were also convicted of “bartering a gun to an Indian” and thievery, respectively.

Another resource, “Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, 1636-1776” is a 15 volume digital set you can access online via the UConn website.

Go to :
http://lib.uconn.edu/find/collections/unique-collections/public-records-of-the-colony-of-connecticut-1636-1776/

Click on the volume you are interested in; they are in chronological order. Once the viewable and searchable PDF opens up, use the magnifying glass icon closest to the image of the book to “search inside” the book. Using John Carrington again,  I found that he was ordered to pay someone for his share of corn, and he was paid for building someone else a coffin.

Much of the proceedings have to do with property and money matters so there is a good chance you will find something in here that involves your ancestor. Happy hunting.

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK – IRISH SOLDIERS PENSIONS

If you have ancestors from Ireland who received an army pension between 1724 and 1924, explore Fold3’s collection of Royal Hospital Kilmainham Pensioner Discharge Documents.

There are two types of documents in this collection, Pension Admissions and Pension Discharge Documents. Information found in these registers can include name, regiment, rank, length of service, illness or disability, birthplace, occupation, physical description, and more. These records are typically arranged by dates so finding what you are looking for might be a little difficult, but the wealth of information may well be worth the effort.

If you are not a Fold3 subscriber, or don’t have access to it through your Ancestry membership, remember you can always access Ancestry, Fold3, and Newspapers.com on the computers in the SGS Library.

Seattle Genealogical Society News

500th ANNIVERSARY OF THE REFORMATION

This month, the world acknowledges the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation. On October 17, 1517, an Augustinian monk named Martin Luther nailed his “95 Theses”, or complaints against the Catholic Church, to the door of the cathedral in Wittenberg, Germany. His main concern was the selling of indulgences, or pardons, to raise money to build St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. His challenge to the Pope would spark the Protestant Reformation in Western Europe, splinter religious beliefs, and incite war.

 

Notice that the word Protestant contains the word “protest” and that reformation contains the word “reform”. Luther was gravely concerned about the way in which getting into heaven was connected with a financial transaction, but this was not his only disagreement with the Catholic Church.

Come learn more about it.

On Sunday, October 29 at the SGS Halloween Open House, there will be treats as well as an audio visual program on “The 500th Anniversary of Martin Luther’s Protestant Revolution” presented by Jean Roth, chair of the SGS German Interest Group.

The prior day, Saturday, October 28, at the Irish and German Special Interest Groups, Jean will feature “Using Church Records for Research”. Church records are important as one of the main sources we, as family historians, use in our genealogical research.

Hope to see you there.

Continue reading

Seattle Genealogical Society Special Presentation

 

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A

SPECIAL PRESENTATION BY

Mary Roddy

NATIONALLY REKNOWN GENEALOGIST

Trails West: Crossing the Continent 1840-1869”

Before the transcontinental railroad was completed Easterners and Mid-Westerners began to settle the West.  How did they get there and what was the journey like?  Presentation covers overland and water routes with descriptions of the journey and using clues to discover how and when your ancestor traveled.

If you have heard Mary’s presentation on “Bagging a Live One” or her excellent explanations on how to use Excell in genealogy, you know what a treat is in store for you when you attend this presentation.

SATURDAY, 14 OCTOBER 2017

1:00 – 2:30 P.M.

SEATTLE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK –
ROBERT G SHAW GENEALOGY/HISTORY INDEXES

Here’s a nice genealogy resource for those of you researching ancestors that lived in either of the adjoining counties of Menominee County, Michigan or Marinette County, Wisconsin.

The Robert G. Shaw Genealogy/History Indexes is a free online collection of databases, articles, and obituaries compiled by local historian, Robert G. Shaw, who read through all the pages of the local newspapers serving Menominee,MI, Marinette, WI and Peshtigo, WI. He put together an extensive index of obituaries/death notices printed in the papers.

This database, largely of newspaper articles and obituaries, can be accessed on the web site of the Spies Public Library of Menominee :

http://joomla.uproc.lib.mi.us/Spies/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=81&Itemid=131

Although the index does not provide links to the actual obituaries, it will give you the date/page number to find them yourself using online newspapers, or to request them from the local public library or historical/genealogical society.

While you are at their web site, check out the other resources in the drop down list of the Genealogy tab. There’s a link to a list of Menominee Count Cemeteries as well as a link to Riverside Cemetery Burial Records, plus a few other resources.