Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Copy & Paste Census Data

TIP OF THE WEEK – SELECT, COPY, AND PASTE 
PAGES OF CENSUS DATA 

  Here’s a nifty process to extract full page(s) of US Census Data from Ancestry (or FamilySearch) and paste it into Google Sheets to make a table of the data.

To copy the Census Data into Google Sheets you will be using the commands Select, Copy, and Paste Special – Values Only. Below I’ll describe the basic process using Ancestry and Google Sheets. If you prefer to use Excel instead of Google Sheets, you will use the commands Select, Copy, and Paste Special as text; nearly an identical process.

Step one is to search and find the US Census record you want to collect data from and use View Image to open the actual image. In Ancestry, located at the center bottom of your screen next to the image number, you will see an icon resembling a person. It’s called the “Index Button”. Click on it. Notice a transcription of the Census page is now displayed in the lower portion of the screen. Place your cursor anywhere in that area of the lower portion of your screen and click. Now you’ll use the shortcuts:    Ctrl + A               to select all data; data will now be highlighted    Ctrl + C              to copy all data you selected above    Ctrl + Shift + V  to paste special that copied data into Google Sheets
Move forward or backward to the next Census record image, repeating the 3 command steps shown above , until you have copied all the data from the Census you want, and you have pasted that data into your Google Sheets table. Now you can filter and analysis the data you have collected.

For more detail on filtering, table formatting, practical applications, and suggestions, take the time to watch one or two of these videos by Connie Knox of GenealogyTV :

  • Find More Ancestors By Extracting Census Data Into Google Sheets  
  • #1 Way to Breakdown Brick Walls – Updated 2020 

Connie uses this process for FAN Club or Cluster research. Here are the links for those videos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgSSYl5oJdU

https://genealogytv.org/2020/10/16/1-way-to-break-down-brick-walls-updated-2020/

Seattle Genealogical Society TIP OF THE WEEK –  RootsTech Video Archive  

TIP OF THE WEEK –  RootsTech Video Archive  

Videos from many of the past RootsTech conferences are available for your viewing online. You can search the videos by conference year or by speaker. Right now the years you’ll find in the archive are 2015-2020. If you missed the entire conference or simply want to review a single session, visit : 
https://www.rootstech.org/video-archive?lang=eng

Seattle Genealogical Society 1950 Census

TIP OF THE WEEK – 1950 U.S. CENSUS 
It’s almost here! The long awaited 1950 U.S. census will be released to the public in April 2022. FamilySearch expects it will happen on April 1st. This census will not be indexed when it is first released. The time it will take to index depends on how many volunteer for the job and how dedicated they are. The 1940 census consisted of roughly 132 million people and took 4 months to index. The 1950 census consists of approximately 150 million people.  

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week 1921 Census of England and Wales

TIP OF THE WEEK –
1921 CENSUS OF ENGLAND AND WALES

The National Archives of the UK has announced the 1921 Census of England and Wales will be available online at Findmypast beginning January 6, 2022. This census is especially important since the 1931 census was destroyed by fire and no census was taken in 1941 because of World War II. 

Here’s a link to the news release from the National Archives of the UK: 
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/1921-census-online-publication-date-announced/

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week DNA Sales

TIP OF THE WEEK –
‘TIS THE SEASON

  Predictably, DNA Test kits and memberships with the major DNA testing companies and family history research companies are on sale in November. 

Ancestry is advertising their autosomal DNA Test kits on sale for $59 plus shipping. Also they have gift membership subscriptions on sale for 30% off. This sale is advertised to run until November 24, 2021.  No guarantee, but in previous Novembers their autosomal DNA Test kits have sold for $49 plus shipping on Black Friday. 

23andMe is advertising their Ancestry+Traits service for $79 (20% savings) and their Health+Ancestry Service for $99 (50% savings). This sale is advertised to run until November 29, 2021. 

MyHeritage is offering DNA tests for $47 plus shipping and gift membership subscriptions starting at $99. 

If you are in the market for DNA tests or membership subscriptions, check out each company’s web site for the services and deals that suit your needs.  

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Book Sale

TIP OF THE WEEK –
SGS BOOK SALE

WE’RE HAVING A BOOK SALE!

SGS has successfully moved our library to the Good Shepherd Center and will open soon for your research use. Meanwhile, at our former home on Sand Point Way there remain many, many books and periodicals that will not be making the move – and a few file cabinets, chairs, tables and bookcases as well. Don’t miss this chance to give some good books a new home!

SGS BOOK SALE – MEMBERS ONLY HOURS 
Thursday, November 11, 2021, 10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Sale opens to the general public from 1:00 to 4:00 pm.

SGS BOOK SALE – OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
Friday, November 12, 2021, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Everything must go!

The sale will be held in our former library space under the blue awning at

Seattle Genealogical Society, 6200 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

(click link for map and directions)

  • Masks required
  • Limited to 20 people at a time inside the sale
  • Please bring your own bags and boxes to carry the treasures you find!
  • Hardcover book – $1.00 each
  • Softcover publications – $0.50
  • Oversized publications – $2.50
  • Magazines – $0.25 each 
  • Journals – $0.50 each 
  • Office furniture and other items as marked
  • Cash Only

All proceeds support the programs and library of the Seattle Genealogical Society.
For more information: opsassist@seagensoc.org

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Learn the Leeds Method

TIP OF THE WEEK –
LEARN THE LEEDS METHOD
WITH A VIDEO 

The Leeds Method is simple, useful, and visual. After doing it once, you might comment “Gee, why didn’t I think of that?”. This method can be especially helpful for an adoptee or for someone with an unknown parent or grandparent. 

In the Leeds Method you are organizing your DNA matches; therefore, generating hints for yourself by grouping your DNA matches according to shared (in common) DNA. Your matches are color coded and displayed in columns in a table.

In the purest form you will end up with 4 columns, each representing one of your grandparents’ family line. Then you must further evaluate each column of shared DNA matches by doing traditional genealogy.

You can learn the steps and  more about the Leeds Method at Dana Leeds’ website:
https://www.danaleeds.com/

But, since the Leeds Method is so visual, why not get a quick start by watching Dana’s presentation at RootsTech 2019.  In the video, she is the third speaker in the hour-long Power Hour Session entitled “You Can Do DNA”. In this video, there are 3 speakers and 3 subjects:

 “Do: The Right Test”  with Christi Jacobsen
   “Do: Understand Your Ethnicity” with Diahan Southard
   “Do: Work on Your Matches” with Dana Leeds


Watch the entire video or skip to about 40 minutes to see Dana’s presentation.

Here’s the link:
https://www.rootstech.org/video/you-can-do-dna?lang=eng

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Shared DNA Explained

TIP OF THE WEEK –
SHARED DNA EXPLAINED IN A TABLE

It happens frequently. Someone orders an autosomal DNA test, returns their DNA specimen, and when their results come in, they are confused by what it all means — what is a cM (centimorgan), how significant is this amount of shared DNA,  and why does the predicted relationship say this match is a first cousin, when it actually is a great uncle? 

In Family Tree Magazine online, I found the basics of DNA matches explained concisely, along with a table titled “Estimating Relationships from Shared DNA”. It all fits on one printed page. A cheat sheet, if you will; it should be helpful to the DNA novice. The table is compact with each row showing:

  • average shared DNA  in cM 
  • average shared DNA  in percentages 
  • probable/possible relationship(s) for this amount of shared DNA
  • range of shared DNA in cM for this relationship 

Here’s the link to the page: https://mcusercontent.com/2b76c2acbc8531a2e530e3d9c/files/c24cf322-0006-da9c-a69b-8355df4e722e/How_to_Use_Shared_DNA_to_Determine_Relationships.pdf

If you are interested in learning more about DNA, SGS has two user groups, the DNA Special Interest Group that meets quarterly, and a DNA Workshop Group that meets monthly.  See the Calendar of Events on the SGS website for upcoming meetings.  

https://seagensoc.org/

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Freedmen’s Bureau Collection

TIP OF THE WEEK –
THE FREEDMEN’S BUREAU COLLECTION

A bill, passed by U.S. Congress and signed by President Abe Lincoln, established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands on March 3, 1865. It was part of their plan for reconstructing the post-Civil War South. This bureau, commonly known as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was headed by Union Army General Oliver Otis Howard (Yes, Howard University was named for him).  President Andrew Jackson and the Southern States were vehemently opposed to the Freedmen’s Bureau and it was disbanded in 1872. 

From 1865-1872, the Freedmen’s Bureau was charged with overseeing the transition to freedom for over 4 million formerly enslaved people, providing assistance to them, as well as to poor whites and veterans displaced by the Civil War.

The 3.5 million records of the Freedmen’s Bureau have long been available on microfiche at the National Archives. Now that these records have been transcribed and digitized, they are searchable, and available for free to everyone via Ancestry. If you are not an Ancestry subscriber, you simply need to open a free Ancestry guest account.  

These records may help African Americans trace their family’s history in America. 

The scope of these records includes, but is not limited to:

  • Legalization of marriages entered into during slavery
  • Labor contracts with land owners
  • Bounty claims, pensions, and back pay for soldiers
  • Apprenticeship disputes and complaints

Watch this short video describing the interesting information you can find in this varied collection of records from the Freedmen’s Bureau:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swIrgxVPEnc

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week Webtember

TIP OF THE WEEK –
WEBTEMBER

  Legacy Family Tree is inviting everyone to their free, online genealogy conference. When? Each Friday during the month of September 2021. 

Described as “Webtember: All Genealogy. All September Long”, there will be a combination of 30 Live and Pre-recorded webinars. No need to register for the pre-recorded webinars, but if you wish to attend any of the live webinars, please register in advance.   

One of the four speakers appearing on Friday, September 17th, is Janice Lovelace, former SGS board member. She will be presenting “Afro-LatinX in the Old West” at 11:00 AM EDT. 

For free register or more information about Webtember, visit here: 
https://familytreewebinars.com/intermediate_page.php?diply_nm=Webtember