Let’s Talk About…. Weyerhaeuser, IA TO WA

We here in the heavily timbered land of the Pacific Northwest have certainly seen and heard the name of Weyerhaeuser Company and know it has something to do with the timber and lumbering industry. We’d never have guessed that Frederick Weyerhaeuser (1834-1914) began his company in the Mississippi River town of Davenport, Iowa, but he did.

The company was founded in 1900 by Frederick Weyerhaeuser who had emigrated to the U.S. from Germany when he was 18. He worked first as a laborer in Erie, Pennsylvania, where he met and married Elisabeth Bladel. In 1856, the young couple moved to Rock Island, Illinois (across the river from Davenport). Weyerhaeuser found work in a sawmill and lumber yard, eventually becoming foreman and arduously began saving his money. Weyerhaeuser was a workaholic and by the mid-1860s he had purchased the mill and was buying pine tracts in Wisconsin, expanding into Minnesota, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

By 1903, Weyerhaeuser owned more than 1.5 million acres of land in Washington even though he kept his residence in St. Paul. He was survived by seven children; his son, John P. Weyerhaeuser, succeeded him as president of the company. Demands for lumber during World War I led to a substantial increase in the company’s business. The military demand for lumber was so high that the Army sent soldiers to work as lumberjacks in Weyerhaeuser’s forests to increase production. By 1941, industry executives joined John P. Weyerhaeuser and Washington Gov. Arthur Lang in dedicating the nation’s first tree farm near Montesano.

And it all started with a hard-working German immigrant in a small Midwestern town.

(Thanks to www.historylink.org for the information on Weyerhaeuser.)  If you want all the details of his life, click to Google.

International German Genealogy Partnership Conference June 9-11, 2023

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Register now to save on IGGP’s
2023 German genealogy conference
Registration for the hybrid International German Genealogy Partnership conference June 9-11, 2023, is off to a great start. Save money by registering to attend virtually or in-person through March 3, when the fees will increase.

Although our name is “German genealogy,” it’s not just about Germany. German-speakers leaving Europe went east, west, north and south, and their descendants live on just about every continent today. Then there were those ancestors who stayed in Europe and lived through the changing borders of what we call Germany. Our speakers and other activities try to reflect that diversity of experience. For example, we’ll have a traveling exhibit on 1700 Years of Jewish Life in German-Speaking Lands from the Leo Baeck Institute.

The full list of speakers and topics will be announced well before early-bird registration ends. Don’t forget our Connection sessions, where you can talk directly with other attendees on specific topics such as regional research in Germany, DNA, and locating records. And Whova, our conference app, will allow you to find and connect on your own with attendees who share your interests.

This is just to say … wherever your ancestors lived, we welcome you to attend the 2023 conference!

While you’re registering, you might want to buy the USB drive where all the available recorded presentations will be preserved for your personal use. Only attendees can buy it and only until the conference ends.
Register here

Going Virtual Team Named One of 2022’s Outstanding Teams

Since 2003, the Washington State Genealogical Society has recognized over 600 outstanding volunteers and teams, nominated by their local society or genealogical organization for their service and dedication. These volunteers are the backbone of their local society, giving their time and expertise, to the organization and the field of genealogy. In the coming months, you will be introduced to each of the 2022 award recipients and learn why they received the 2022 WSGS Outstanding Volunteer and Team Award.

Today we’re introducing the Going Virtual Team that was nominated by the South King County Genealogical Society (SKCGS). The team was comprised of MaryLynn Strickland and Valorie Zimmerman.

In March 2020 at the beginning of the COVID pandemic, SKCGS had only a beginning virtual foundation, using Groups IO as a member-and-friends forum to communicate topics of interest. SKCGS also had access to the free non-profit version of Google Enterprise and the board of directors had discussed implementing some features. 

To capitalize on these assets and jump to complete virtual, MaryLynn and Valorie immediately began experimenting with Google Meet. Within two months, the society was meeting online for board and monthly general meetings, special interest groups for Family Tree Software Users, Genetic Genealogy, a new monthly Genealogy Chat and signup study group. Training was “immersive” – learn by doing, as MaryLynn and Valorie coaxed members along and enlisted others to help.

MaryLynn’s and Valorie’s enthusiastic, can-do attitude buoyed this effort from the beginning. Their give-and-take as virtual co-facilitators has inspired a lively, collaborative, participative approach in SKCGS meetings, with members/attendees from many different states. 

For more information on the WSGS Outstanding Volunteer Award program, visit the Recognition page of the WSGS website or contact Info@wasgs.org. Please type “Volunteer Award.”

MyHeritage Free Access to Australian Records

I’m excited to share that in honor of Australia Day, MyHeritage is offering free access to all 95 million of our records from Australia!

Over the past few months, MyHeritage has added more than 25 new collections from Australia, bringing our total of Australian collections to 288. These collections come from all over the country and include birth, marriage, death, naturalization, military, passenger lists, and more types of records, and many include high-quality scans of the originals. One recently added collection, Australia, New South Wales, Gaol Inmates & Photos, includes stunning photographs of inmates who served in prison from 1870 to 1930. In some cases, they are the only photos of these individuals that exist.

Be sure to spread the word to your friends and followers with family connections Down Under so they get the chance to browse this unique collection at https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-Australia/ and find information about their families in records from Australia — totally free! Read more about this offer on our blog, and feel free to use the graphic below.

By the way, it’s not only Australians who can benefit from recent additions to MyHeritage. During the last two months of 2022, we added an astonishing 67 record collections containing a total of 65 million collections from all over the world! You can read more details on our blog.

Australia-Free-records

Enjoy!

Heritage Quest Research Library Beginning Genealogy Part B

Beginning Your Family Story
Part B

You have decided to take on this role as Family Historian, so now what?
What about those family heirlooms?
Roadblocks and how to avoid them.
What to find at a research library.

Beginning Genealogy: Session II Now that you have made it through the Beginning Genealogy Class it’s time to gather the family lore, documents, family treasures and begin to build your Family History.
Was that story about walking to school up-hill both ways really true?

Join us:
Thursday, February 2, 2023
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
ZOOM FREE!

You can sign-up at: www.hqrl.com
Go to the HQRL STORE 
A ZOOM link will be sent to your email 2 days before the class. 

Let’s Talk About….Nuns & Can Buoys

Here I stand between a nun buoy and a can buoy. I knew buoys (whether ocean, lake or river) came in red and green and that was about it. The plaque below reads:

“Buoys are floating navigational aids that mark channels, hazards and prohibited areas and also help navigators locate their position. Buoys are coded by color, shape and numbers. They are moored to the bed of a waterway by chain or rope to concrete sinkers. Nun buoys are red with cone-shaped tops. They mark the right side of a waterway when entering a channel from the sea. Nun buoys carry even numbers.  Can buoys are green and are square or shaped like a large can. They mark the left side when entering a channel from seaward. Can buoys carry odd numbers.”

Capt. Kelly explained all this to us (a rapt audience) and then with a smile told of how buoys get “whacked” by ships or barges and float loose……… to end up on the sand or even up in the trees during high water. He said at one point there was a program for folks to rescue and return for a bonus these stranded buoys. “But soon that program had to be abandoned,” he said, “because the buoys were disappearing from the river.” (Think about it. 🙂

Lower Columbia Genealogical Society Using Google for Genealogy

Dave Obee will present a program using Google for Genealogy research for the Thursday March 9, 2023 Zoom meeting of the Lower Columbia Genealogical Society

Mr Obee is an award winning international researcher, Author, Editor, publisher and public speaker.

The public is invited to join the Zoom meeting that will open at 6:30 pm for welcome of visitors and announcements. Program will start at 7:00 pm. For a Zoom link contact

lcgsgen@yahoo.com

Carolyn Gibbons Named One of 2022’s Outstanding Volunteers

Since 2003, the Washington State Genealogical Society has recognized over 600 outstanding volunteers and teams, nominated by their local society or genealogical organization for their service and dedication. These volunteers are the backbone of their local society, giving their time and expertise, to the organization and the field of genealogy. In the coming months, you will be introduced to each of the 2022 award recipients and learn why they received the 2022 WSGS Outstanding Volunteer and Team Award.

Today we’re introducing Carolyn Gibbons of Elma, Washington, who was nominated by the Mason County Genealogical Society (MCGS).

Carolyn Gibbons

Carolyn has been the editor of our monthly newsletter since joining MCGS in 2020, after moving here from North Carolina. Although she has no family history in our state, she jumped in and started researching articles from the local paper dating back to 1889. She painstakingly created abstracts of any article that included a specific person’s name, then included a surname index at the back of every newsletter issue. She also carefully itemized a list of Mason County birth and death registers, justice dockets, homestead patents and many more records on FamilySearch that could be abstracted. This project has been a wonderful way for MCGS members to participate during the past two years while staying at home. The society newsletter, which is now over 20 pages long, has grown to be a valuable resource for anyone researching Mason County records.

For more information on the WSGS Outstanding Volunteer Award program, visit the Recognition page of the WSGS website or contact Info@wasgs.org. Please type “Volunteer Award.”

Let’s Talk About….Samuel Clemons/Mark Twain: One Great American

(Sign on lamp post in downtown Hannibal; it reads:  “Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.” )

It was a really, really windy day when our cruise ship ported at Hannibal, Illinois. I put on every jacket and shirt  I had and out I went………could not miss the opportunity to visit Mark Twain. 

I enjoyed the Mark Twain museums (there were two), touring the Thatcher home and just trying to “feel” being there. 

I shall not go into his biography for I’m guessing that’s pretty well known. One of his favorite homilies was that he was born in 1835 when Halley’s Comet could be seen and held onto life until 1910 so he could go out with it.

His personal life was a rather sad affair.  He married Olivia Langdon, who died six years before him. Their first child, Landon Clemons, died at age one. Their first daughter, Olivia Susan, died at age 23. Next child was Jane who passed the year before her father. Only Clara was left, living to 1962. Her daughter, Nina, never married, so Samuel Clemons has no direct descendants.

I never had read any of his books (yes, where have I been all my life?) so bought a book containing five of his best known stories. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was a revolutionary book that still holds much relevance today. The powerful friendship of young Huck and runaway slave Jim highlighted many of the great racial injustices of the past and has astounded generations of readers the world over. It was a darn good read.

Gotta love some of his quotes:

“Never tell the truth to people who are not worthy of it.”

“When in doubt‚ tell the truth.”

“If you tell truth you don’t have to remember anything.”

German Interest Group of The Eastside Genealogical Society

The German Interest Group

of The Eastside Genealogical Society (EGS)meeting

When: Friday, February 3, 2023 from 12:30 to 2:30 pm PT

Zoom Registration required: https://tinyurl.com/2s4azks3

Topic: “How to get Research Help at FamilySearch.org – with emphasis on Germanic research

Come discover what free research help is available at FamilySearch.org. This class will demonstrate how to access and use several FamilySearch resources designed to help you work through your genealogical challenges. Regardless of your research experience or ability, these resources can help you break through the brick walls found in every family tree.

Presenter: Becky Adamson

Becky graduated from BYU-Idaho with an AAS degree in Family History. She is currently enrolled at Strathclyde University, where she has earned her Certificate in Genealogical, Paleographic & Heraldic Studies and is pursuing her Diploma and Masters in the same field of study. She has a passion for United States and British research and is accredited through the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen®) in Scotland research. She is currently working towards her accreditation in the Upper South, United States region. Becky is a Research Specialist on the VIP Hosting and Research Services team at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

More information: Visitors are always welcome. Our website is https://egsgermangroup.wordpress.com/