German Interest Group of The Eastside Genealogical Society (EGS) Meeting

The German Interest Group

of The Eastside Genealogical Society (EGS)meeting

When: Friday, January 3, 2020 from 12:30 to 2:30 pm

(Doors open at 12:10 for networking)

Where: Relief Society Room of the Latter-day Saints Church

10675 NE 20th St, Bellevue, WA 98004

Topic: “German Immigration Patterns Prior to the Revolutionary WarThere were 3 waves of German immigrants to America prior to the Revolutionary war.  He will emphasize the 3rd wave of immigrants, those coming from 1717 to 1775. It’ll include where they came from and why plus where they went.  He will also cover why most did not come to America but went to Eastern Europe.  Much of his material is drawn from Hopeful Journeys, German Immigration, Settlement and Political Culture in Colonial America from the late 1600’s to the start of the Revolutionary war.

Presenter:  Bill Frisinger – His ancestor Ludwig Friderich Freysinger immigrated to Philadelphia in 1754.  The ship and where most of its immigrants came from are well documented but no one has any documentation of where in Europe he came from although most “know” where.  It is just that they are almost certainly wrong.  It is this puzzle that drew him into genealogy.  Later when he received a copy of a journal passed down on his maternal side, he began a more formal study of his ancestors.

More information: https://egsgermangroup.wordpress.com/ . Visitors are always welcome.

GENEALOGICAL FORUM’s Thursday E-News

THE GENEALOGICAL FORUM’s Thursday Evening E-News Edition December 12, 2019
Curious about the status of your GFO Membership? We’d love to have you as a GFO Member!
gfo.org | 503-963-1932 | info@gfo.org Be sure to check the complete GFO CALENDAR.
Also, don’t miss the current issue of The Forum Insider
Thank you for Supporting the GFO and the Oregon Cultural Trust
We are so grateful for everyone who’s been donating during our annual appeal, our only fundraising drive of the year. Thank you! We’re not quite half way to our goal, but we’re confident we can raise what is needed to keep providing you the services and access to historical records you’ve come to rely on.
Your support can go even farther too. The GFO is a member of the Oregon Cultural Trust. You can match the amounts you’ve given to Cultural Trust nonprofits like the GFO and you’ll get 100% of that match back on your Oregon state tax form. (Up to $500 for individuals, $1,000 for couples filing jointly.) Be sure to click over to the Cultural Trust website to get the information you need.
Give Now to Our Annual Appeal
Genealogy Boot Camp for Beginners
Join Laurel Smith on Thursday, January 9 from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm at the GFO for a day of beginning genealogy. There will be sessions about the census, vital records, discussions about genealogy software and database use, organizing your research, using Ancestry.com, and more — all geared toward beginners — but basic computer skills are a prerequisite.
All communications are done via email, and you must be able to download and print the class notes. Bring a sack lunch, snacks, and a beverage so you can keep going as the class does. GFO members may attend for free, non-members $20.
Register for Boot Camp
Have you Moved? Please Tell Us
Please tell us if you’ve moved in the last year. Recently, we had a large number of letters returned to us that could not be delivered. The post office charges more for each returned letter than it costs to mail them out the first time. As a small non-profit we’d rather spend our limited budget on keeping the library open and bolstering resources for you. Please notify membership@gfo.org of any changes to your mailing address.
GFO Files Objection to USCIS Genealogy Fee Hike
We’ve told you in previous weeks that the U.S. Customs and Immigration Service wants to increase fees by nearly 500% for copies of genealogy records. The GFO Board has now filed formal objections to these outrageous fee hikes for access to records like naturalization certificates, alien registration forms, Visa files, registry files, and A-Files. Fees could total $240 to $385 per record! We believe the exorbitant fee increase appears to be an attempt to deny Americans access to the records at all. It will slam the door and close off public records because such fees are simply beyond the means of most of us.
USCIS Genealogy Fee Hikes as charted by Records, Not Revenue.
In addition to filing our objection during the comment period, we have also contacted all federal elected officials from Oregon to urge them to use their influence to stop this as well. We urge all of you who care about keeping public records public to file your own comment. USCIS has reportedly extended the deadline for comments to December 30. Be sure to specifically note both the Genealogy Program and DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010 in your comments.
Comment on Fee Hike
Renovation to Close OHS Research Library
As many of you may know, the Oregon Historical Society is counting down to an exciting new chapter for their Research Library. To allow for extensive renovations of their downtown Portland library starting in March 2020, library staff and collections are moving offsite. The downtown library will remain open through December 28, 2019. They will reopen to researchers by appointment at a temporary offsite location in early spring, and continue to answer reference questions by email and phone during the construction phase. The OHS museum will remain open; no interruption to other OHS activities is anticipated during this time. Details and updates can be found on the OHS website. Questions may be directed to libreference@ohs.org. We at the GFO are looking forward to OHS’s new, enhanced library. We offer our resources for anyone eager to keep researching in the interim.
Friday is Deadline for Comments on Division Transit Project
TriMet has big changes planned for Division Street, starting in front of GFO’s building and extending far to the east. The agency has an “online open house” where you can learn more about the design. Public comments can be submitted through Friday, Dec. 13.
Submit Your Comments Here
If It Snows, We May Close
Here’s a reminder before any winter weather really hits Portland: if it snows, we may reduce hours or close altogether. The best place to find out is online. You can check three places: ▪ Local media website winter closure lists. If we close, we notify Flash Alert Newswire, which instantly adds us to the lists displayed by local media. ▪ The GFO Webpage. We’ll post closures on our homepage. ▪ The GFO Facebook page. Or, you can call us. If no one answers, please don’t come in.
Surplus Book: Amish and Amish Mennonite Genealogies
No pretty pictures or detailed maps in our book of the week—but what a treasure trove of genealogical information! Amish and Amish Mennonite Genealogies by Hugh F. Gingerich and Rachel W. Kreider, 1986, is chock full of names, dates, and locations gleaned from over 125 different sources. The foreword by Joseph F. Beiler states, “This volume offers actual accounts of all known Amish or Amish related immigrants, who came to America
as European peasants who were, in one way or another, denied religious freedom and civil rights—to the promised land.” It provides a preface, introduction, history of the first Amish communities in America, instructions on how to use the book, a code list for sources, and a code list for location—and then, all those names and family
groups in this 848-page tome. There are even two indexes of individuals—one for coded and one for uncoded.
Thumbing through the book, one pencil notation was found. The pages are clean and tight, and the binding is secure. But there is damage to the cover which can be seen in the photo—and the pages closest to that end board have been wrinkled, but not torn. Don’t let this one get away! If interested, please contact booksales@gfo.org. Price if picked up at the GFO is $48. Shipped is $55 (it’s heavy!)
Survey Results: Sweet Traditions
We were a little surprised that more people didn’t have holiday cookie or treat recipes handed down, but we did get a few interesting replies. (However, the survey editor is sad that the prior weeks’ respondents didn’t reach out to share their Thanksgiving cranberry sorbet or decadent spinach recipes.)
Here are a few of the responses we received: My grandmother, and then my mother, used to make cookies at Christmastime called Lard Nuts. They contained (you guessed it) lard, and ammonia. I’m sure you can understand why we don’t make them any longer. As a child, I thought they were pretty nasty. Lebkuchen. I’ve often wondered about how this recipe was passed down. My grandmother made it. She was Scotch. Her husband was German–so perhaps from my paternal great-grandmother? I hear this can be a perfectly lovely treat. But not the way grandma made it–in a jelly roll pan and frosted (the only good part). But it was like the hardest, chewiest, dry fruitcake I’ve ever had. When she died, thankfully the lebkuchen recipe disappeared.
My mother always made “Mary’s Cookies” at Christmas. They are cut outs and my siblings and I decorated them. I did the same with my kids. No one seems to remember who Mary was! Actually there is no recipe…it was all in my grandmother’s head and I observed many times the making of paklava with phyllo made from scratch. I got to sprinkle the nut, sugar & clove filling, roll and cut up the pieces. It’s the dough that is in question because my grandmother made it without measuring…she just knew by the feel when the ratio of milk and butter to flour was right. It was beautiful to watch a small round of dough become a huge paper thin circle. A large table is required for this which is one of the reasons I haven’t tried to recreate the movements I watched so many times …
New Survey: Holiday Genealogy Gifts
This week we’re asking if you have any genealogical gifts on your wish list. Take the survey now.
Take the Survey Now
This week at GFO …
Saturday, December 14th
Writer’s Forum 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Join our peer group of genealogists, who meet to learn about writing and to share our writing with each other. Peggy Baldwin facilitates this group and can be reached at writers@gfo.org.
Sunday, December 15th
Library Work Party 9:00 a.m. – Noon
There’s lots to do and we’d love to have your help. Doors open at 9 and work usually wraps up around noon. Some people come for just an hour or so; others work the full time. You are welcome to do either. Any time you can share is valuable. Hope to see you there.
French Canada Group 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Share stories of our history. Come and join this group to learn more about French Canadian ancestry and Acadia. The group leader is Bob LaMarche. FrCan@gfo.org
Wednesday, December 18th
Learn & Chat 10:00 a.m. – Noon
Co-facilitator Sandy Alto aptly named Learn and Chat as a “genealogy self-help” group. Come attend the Learn and Chat group if you want to learn about anything genealogical. Contact facilitator Sandy Alto with your questions at learnandchat@gfo.org.
DNA Q&A: The Basics 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
This meeting is for those who are just beginning to use DNA testing for genealogy. Each class begins with a presentation of general information about DNA testing. General questions regarding DNA testing are welcome at the end of each planned discussion. Lisa McCullough leads this group.. Questions? dna_qa@gfo.org
GFO Library Open Late Until 8:00 p.m.

Eastern Washington Genealogical Society January Luncheon

Save the Date

Our Year of Change!

Join us for a great Pasta Luncheon at Mukogowa. Enjoy an informative webinar: “Do You Have Brick Walls?” from the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS). And Honor and visit with our past Presidents.

When: January 4, 2020. Time: Doors open at 11:30 Lunch at 12:00-

Program to Follow

Where: Mukogowa | 4000 W. Randolph Road | Spokane, WA. 99224

Buffet Pasta Bar and Webinar

Registration: $25.00

By Pay Pal at ewsgi.org

OR

Mail Check to:

EWGS

P.O. Box 1826

Spokane, WA 99210

GENEALOGICAL FORUM’s Thursday E-News

THE GENEALOGICAL FORUM’s Thursday Evening E-News Edition December 5, 2019
Curious about the status of your GFO Membership? We’d love to have you as a GFO Member!
gfo.org | 503-963-1932 | info@gfo.org Be sure to check the complete GFO CALENDAR.
Also, don’t miss the current issue of The Forum Insider
Support the GFO: Preserve Heritage for the Future
Your support is essential to providing all the resources, records, and education that the Genealogical Forum of Oregon offers. We are striving to remain relevant in a climate where some believe “it is all online.” (In fact, we have a big announcement coming soon about more digitally searchable GFO resources.)
We’re 100% volunteer. No paid staff. No paid fundraisers. So every penny goes to support the GFO’s mission. A month ago, our website service unexpectedly jumped 22% to $1968 per year.
Database subscriptions rose 10% to $5370 per year.
Rent increases $1200 each year. Member dues cover only 24% of our budget. Will you please help us fill the gap? We ask this only once a year. We seek to raise $28,500 during this annual appeal. ➢ Your $75 donation could pay for two months of our website cost increase.
➢ Your $100 donation would offset one month’s rent increase.
➢ Your $448 donation would cover one month of database subscriptions. Please make your tax deductible gift now:
Give Now to Our Annual Appeal
Genealogy Boot Camp for Beginners
Will one of your 2020 New Year’s Resolutions be to start working in earnest on your family history? If so, join Laurel Smith on Saturday, January 9 from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm at the GFO for a day of beginning genealogy. There will be sessions about the census, vital records, discussions about genealogy software and database use, organizing your research, using Ancestry.com, and more — all geared toward beginners — but basic computer skills are a prerequisite.
All communications are done via email, and you must be able to download and print the class notes. Bring a sack lunch, snacks, and a beverage so you can keep going as the class does. GFO members may attend for free, non-members $20.
Register for Boot Camp
Give a GFO Gift Membership and Get Two Extra Months Yourself
Need a gift for that hard-to-buy-for person? We have a special offer! If you give a GFO membership as a gift, we’ll give you two extra months on your current membership! If you give two gifts, you’ll get four extra months. Give the meaningful gift of family history this holiday season with a membership to the GFO. It’s so easy. Just click below for more details.
Give a Gift Membership Today
All memberships will begin January 1, 2020. Orders must be received by the GFO by December 10 to be fulfilled by Christmas.
Spring Seminar 2020 “Solve Puzzles with DNA”
We are pleased to announce our Spring Seminar, “Solve Puzzles with DNA,” on April 4 & 5, to be presented by national genetic genealogy author and educator Karen Stanbary, CG®, MA, LCSW.
Karen is best known as a course coordinator at three national week-long genealogy institutes: GRIP (Chromosome Mapping), IGHR (Intermediate DNA), and SLIG (Meeting Standards Using DNA Evidence). She received the National Genealogical Society Quarterly Award for Excellence for her complex evidence case study incorporating traditional research and DNA analysis (June 2016 issue), and was a contributor to Advanced Genetic Genealogy: Techniques and Case Studies by Debbie Parker Wayne, ed. (2019). Karen holds the credential Certified Genealogist from the Board for Certification of Genealogists, where she serves as a Trustee and is chair of the standing DNA Committee. Additionally, Karen was a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in her first career, and she will share her insight and expertise with us on managing conversations about unexpected DNA results during the Saturday program. Registration for the Spring Seminar will begin Dec. 21. More information can be found here.
GivingTuesday a Great Success!
Jane McGarvin greeted new arrivals and handed out visitor passes. 48 energetic volunteers + 4 dozen donuts and a dozen bagels + 40 cups of coffee + 9 large pizzas + some miscellaneous goodies = 218.5 hours of laughter, discovery, and library organization! That’s what GivingTuesday was all about. The books in the library are now better organized and should be easier for everyone to find.
Some participants stated that they didn’t realize the depth of the collection—and that they wanted to come back to research in the books they saw.
Lots of folks tackled inventory. Cathy Lauer worked diligently to fix mistakes in our catalog.
Thank you to those who came to help. But the work’s not done!
Many missing books were located. More missing items were identified.
Now, the library team will use the markers placed to get things in even better shape. And we’d love to have your help if you have time to give. There are lots of different jobs. Just send us a message library@gfo.org if you’d like to help.
Pizza was enjoyed by many.
Immigration Record Fees Could Increase 400%
A couple of weeks ago on our Facebook page we told you about plans by U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) to increase fees for genealogy records by over 400%.
A group of genealogists, historians and records access advocates created a website, “Records, Not Revenue,” to help people protest these hikes. “Records, Not Revenue” writes, “Many of these records should already be publicly accessible under the law. USCIS is essentially holding them hostage, demanding individuals pay exorbitant fees to access documents of our immigrant ancestors.” Comments on the fee hikes are due by December 16, 2019. Learn more about this issue and how you can make your voice heard by clicking on the button below.
Learn More Here
Ford Building Pop-Up Market
Come shop for the holidays in the shops above our heads at the GFO Library. The Ford Building is hosting a holiday pop-up market on Dec. 7. Businesses participating include: ▪ Tendue – Suite 255 ▪ Whimsy Wondering ▪ Levity CBD – Suite 113 ▪ Hannah Naomi Jewelry Design – Suite 250 ▪ Airtype – Suite 313 ▪ Artist Aretha Ryan – Suite B-05
News from the Library: Something new
You’ll soon be seeing more of these at the GFO–shelf markers to insert between books when a book is removed from the shelf. President Vince Patton saw something similar at a library in California, and Mac McGarvin has taken on the job of creating shelf markers for us. (Thanks to Vince and Mac.) They will be hanging on hooks in the aisles. Take a book off the shelf … insert a shelf marker … reshelf a book … pull the marker and return it to the hook. Hopefully, this will help with getting books back to the right spot after our inventory. They are already getting rave reviews!
Survey Results: Family Traditions
As expected, many of us honor family traditions, either in what we do or what we eat.
Here are some of the comments that were shared: Great-great-grandmother’s phenomenal cranberry sorbet! [survey editor wants the recipe!] A spinach casserole that is too decadent to qualify as a vegetable–cream cheese, sour cream, and bacon are featured! [survey editor wants this recipe too!] We always have what I have started calling “Sacred Rolls”. If you mess up when it’s your turn to make them, or, God forbid, you change the recipe, you might be excommunicated from the family! The recipe has been in the family for 4-5 generations now. My mother’s family has had a tradition that lasted over 50 years: Football! My grandfather, born and raised in Nebraska, was a great Nebraska football supporter. His brother, also born in Nebraska, moved to Oklahoma and became a great Sooner supporter. Every year the two families would get together on Thanksgiving, one year in Norman Oklahoma, the next year in Lincoln, Nebraska. When the rivalry became hottest, Thanksgiving dinner was moved from Thursday to Wednesday, because it was not clear if everyone would be talking to the other side after the game. This year we are skipping the turkey and making dishes from the countries our ancestors came from including Italy, Germany, France and England. We are thankful for our ancestors, wouldn’t be here without them.
New Survey: Sweet Traditions
Your survey editor is still thinking about the sorbet and spinach dish mentioned in last week’s replies. I want those recipes! And so, continuing with a food theme this week, we’re asking about cookie, candy, or treat recipes that you may have that have been handed down from you ancestors.
Take the Survey Now
This week at GFO …
Saturday, December 7th
Virginia Interest Group 10:00 a.m – Noon
Join us as we have a short discussion about West Virginia history and research followed by a time to get together and discuss genealogy. Share your research, ask questions, and let us know what the group can do to help you. Talk about your brick walls or your successes.
Generally, for our December meeting, some of us elect to bring snacks/finger food to get the holiday season going. Please do not feel obligated to do so. We want this to be a fun time of sharing with no one rolling their eyes as we talk genealogy! For more information see our blog: “Virginia Roots and Vines.” If you would like more information about this group or have questions, please contact Judi Scott or Carol Surrency at:virginia@gfo.org.
German Interest Group 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
The German Interest Group is intended to be a source of information and inspiration for anyone with German speaking ancestors. One goal is to provide information on a variety of topics related to Germanic history and migration. We also will provide time for members to share their research journeys and connect with others who may be researching the same region or time period. If you have any questions, email group facilitators Mike Fernandez and Tia Cobb at: german@gfo.org.
Sunday, December 8th
Library Work Party 9:00 a.m. – Noon
There’s lots to do and we’d love to have your help. Doors open at 9 and work usually wraps up around noon. Some people come for just an hour or so; others work the full time. You are welcome to do either. Any time you can share is valuable. Hope to see you there.
Tuesday, December 10th
GFO Board Meeting 6:10 – 8:10 p.m.
Wednesday, December 11th
PMUG Free Class: Photos on Apple iOS Devices 6:00-8:00 p.m.
The Portland Macintosh Users Group will meet at the GFO for a class focused on tips for creating photos using an iPhone, iPad, or iTouch. Registration is required for this class.
• Terms: iOS devices are the iPhone, iPad, and iTouch
• Explore how to edit Photos on iOS devices
• Explore optional photo editors on iOS devices
• Watch demos of alternative photo programs
• See ways of organizing and storing photos on iOS.
For additional information or to register: Call 503-228-1779 or email: college@pmug.org.
Bring your iPhone, iPad, or iTouch to participate with instruction.
GFO Library Closes at 8:00 p.m.

Finding your Female Ancestors at the Hayden Library

Dear Friends,

I’ve scheduled a three-month genealogy series to delve into the extraordinary lives of our female ancestors, in particular, those born during the early 20th century when the women’s suffrage movement led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. The workshop will last about an hour with informal sharing, so bring your bagged lunch as we have the room until 12:00 p.m.

FINDING YOUR FEMALE ANCESTORS AT HAYDEN LIBRARY
Saturday, Jan 11 at 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Where Were Your Female Ancestors Celebrating the Vote: 100 Years of Women’s Suffrage


Saturday, Feb 8 at 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Finding American Women’s Voices through the Centuries: Letters, Diaries, Journals, Newspapers, and Court Records

Saturday, March 14 at 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Nineteenth Century Women Settlers Confront the Far West

“The Seneca Falls Convention framed a national discussion about women’s rights in America and marked the beginning of a massive civil rights movement that would span the next 70 years. The right to vote was seen as the first step to change the traditional and unjust systems that existed. Women worked for equal rights.” 

You might want to get your hands on a good book or two for “light” reading. I’d recommend The Ladies of Seneca Falls: The Birth of the Woman’s Rights Movement (Studies in the Life of Women). You could goggle using the terms: “books on women’s suffrage” or just read websites. 

Merry Christmas, and I hope will to see you soon.

Your friend,

Kim Morgan

https://www.facebook.com/findingmyancestor/

https://www.findingancestors.net

Tacoma Pierce County Genealogical Society Holiday Gala

Please join us on Tuesday, December 10th for our Holiday Gala, beginning at 6 pm.  This is always a “fun” event.  A chance for us to socialize, share some great snacks, and maybe even play some genealogy games. Bring a friend — or two!  This is a great way to introduce family and friends to TPCGS.

Bates Technical College South Campus,  2201 S 78th St, Building E, Tacoma, WA.

Take exit 129 onto Tacoma Mall Boulevard; Turn left and go to 78th Street; Turn right into the college: 2201 S 78th St.We look forward to seeing you there!

Jane Irish Nelson TPCGS Webmaster

Seattle Genealogical Society Tip of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK –
DIGITAL LIBRARY AT FamilySearch
  Thanks to Dick Eastman and his free online genealogy newsletter for reminding us about the FamilySearch Digital Library and its collection of more than 440,000 digitized genealogy and family history books and publications right at our fingertips.

At the Digital Library, you can dive into family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines, gazetteers, and even medieval histories and pedigrees. (You do have your free FamilySearch account, right? Be sure to be logged in.) 

Visit FamilySearch.org, and click Search in the top menu. Then, in the drop-down menu, click Books

Or you can also go directly to the new URL—FamilySearch.org/library/books

The content of the digital library is freely viewable. On the home page of the Digital Library, use the simple search bar to search by a surname, historical events, groups of people, book title, or names of places. Go ahead! Try it.

Check back often as more and more books are being added to the Digital Library every day.